• PARLIAMENT NEWS

BREAST CANCER AWARENESS EVENT AT THE GLOBAL WOMEN CLUB IN LONDON

October is the month of breast cancer awareness around the word and consciousness is incredibly important as early detection, often through screening, can catch the disease when it is most treatable.



Every year around 11,500 women and 85 men die from breast cancer in the UK – that’s nearly 1,000 deaths each month, 31 each day or one every 45 minutes. Breast cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the UK.

Giving the figures, campaigning creating awareness is crucial. This is one of the reasons Parliamentary Society friends and members joined CEO of the Global Woman Club Mirela Sula on a special event they created creating awareness on this issue.

Rebeca Riofrio Chairwoman for the Parliamentary Society of Arts , Mirela Sula CEO Global Woman Club, Anastasia Iva owner of Iva Jewels and ambassador for White Ribbon Foundation, Chelsey Baker director of the National Mentoring Day, Dr Sophia Bouzia of Your Heath First Clinic, Pegah Pourmand owner of La Pearlin and Zineb Faress founder of Raphia Chocolatier London

Rebeca Riofrio Chairwoman for the Parliamentary Society of Arts together with, Zineb Faress founder of Raphia Chocolatier London, Chelsey Baker director of the National Mentoring Day, Dr Sophia Bouzia of Your Heath First Clinic, Pegah Pourmand owner of La Pearlin and Anastasia Iva owner of Iva Jewels and ambassador for White Ribbon Foundation joined this cause during an event at the Richmond Hill Hotel in London.


Over 47 women shared their experiences in life and business and concluded with ‘walk for life’ pink catwalk.


Anastasia Iva owner of Iva Jewels and ambassador for White Ribbon Foundation talking at the Global Women Club

Mirela Sura CEO Global Woman Club andAnastasia Iva owner of Iva Jewels and ambassador for White Ribbon Foundation

Chelsey Baker director of the National Mentoring Day talking at the Women Club London



Pegah Pourmand owner of La Pearlin talking at the Women Club London

Women Club London - 'Walking for Life' in Pink - Cancer Awareness Month

Zineb Faress founder of Raphia Chocolatier London talking at the Women Club London

Women Club London - 'Walking for Life' in Pink - Cancer Awareness Month

Women Club London - 'Walking for Life' in Pink - Cancer Awareness Month

Global Women Club London - Breast Cancer Awareness Event

Global Women Club London - Breast Cancer Awareness Event

Statistics:

Almost half (47%) of women in the UK do not check their breasts regularly for potential signs of breast cancer.

According to a YouGov survey commissioned by Breast Cancer Now, one in 10 women have ‘never checked their breasts for new or unusual changes’. Meanwhile, a fifth (19%) of women check their breasts ‘once every six months or less’, while 13% do this ‘once a year or less’.

Asked what stops or prevents them from checking their breasts more regularly, almost half (46%) of women said they ‘forget’. This is concerning when most cases of the disease are detected because women have spotted new or unusual changes to their breasts.

Checking your breasts only takes a few minutes. Everyone will have their own way of touching and looking for changes, but remember to check the whole breast area, including your upper chest and armpits.

There’s no special technique and you don’t need training. Find out more about the signs and symptoms of breast cancer.


What Are Some Signs and Symptoms of Breast Cancer?

Every woman should know how her breasts normally look and feel, so she can recognize any changes that may occur. “While knowing what to look for is important, a woman should still get her regular mammograms and clinical breast exams, as these tests can help detect breast cancer before she even has symptoms,” said Tuite.


Signs of breast cancer may include:

· Lump in the breast or underarm (armpit)

· Swelling or thickening of all or part of the breast

· Dimpling or skin irritation of breast skin

· Localised, persistent breast pain

· Redness, scaliness or thickening of the nipple or breast skin

· Nipple discharge (other than breast milk)

· Any change in the size or shape of the breast


Breast Cancer Risk Factors

The main risk factors for breast cancer include being a woman and getting older (most breast cancers are found in women ages 55 and older). Uncontrollable factors that may increase risk include personal/family history, race, breast density and menstrual period history. In addition, having changes in certain breast cancer genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) increases the risk of developing breast cancer.

Certain risk factors are lifestyle-related, including the use of birth control pills, hormone therapy after menopause, having children, drinking alcohol, being overweight or obese, and not being physically active. Having one or several risk factors does not mean a woman will develop breast cancer. “Women need to become familiar with all of the risk factors. For those they can control, they need to make smart lifestyle decisions that can lower the risk,” said Tuite.


To lower risk of breast cancer:

· Get to and stay at a healthy weight. Balance your food intake with physical activity to avoid excess weight gain.

· Be physically active. Every week, get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity (or a combination of these).

· Limit or avoid alcohol. The ACS recommends that women have no more than one alcoholic drink per day.

For support and information, call Breast Cancer Now's free Helpline on 0808 800 6000